MAR

THE VANISHING, OR TIME GOES AWAY


NOSTALGIA
The programmes dissect a country in the throes of a nostalgia effect. From playgrounds and kuehs, to vanishing architecture and hawkers; through omnipresent symbols and the impetus to reminisce and romanticise. We take a stroll down memory lane and into the future, to figure out what was lost, what we’re losing, and what we’re only afraid to lose—and why.

INTERACTIVE PLAYGROUND

Everything You Know Goes Away


Designed by Joshua Comaroff & Lekker Architects, with collaborator Leow Si Min

Everything you know goes away takes the form of an interactive playground that addresses nostalgia through the use of everyday icons and forgotten histories.

From the ubiquitous Toa Payoh dragon playground, to the notoriously dangerous Big Splash slides, to endangered flora and fauna, tidbits of Singapore culture are served up on a nostalgic playground with a contemporary twist.

Whether you are a #throwback milliennial or a young-at-heart parent, come reminisce and consume your fantasies and fallacies of nostalgia in this interactive playground.

Suitable for children aged 6 to 12!
16 MAR–7 APR
Tuesday–Friday, 2–7PM
Saturday–Sunday, 12–8PM
Closed on Monday

The Substation Theatre

Free Admission


SCHOOL HOLIDAY SPECIAL
16, 17, 23 & 24 MAR, 2 & 3PM

Drop by on the school holiday weekends for the wondrous tales of Bedah’s Fantastical Travel’s with Epok-Epok!

The free storytelling sessions are a very special playground commission by Suhaili Safari.



Tuesday–Friday, 2–7PM
Saturday–Sunday, 12–8PM
Closed on Monday

The Substation Gallery

Free Admission
INSTALLATION

A Bout of Nostalgia


Artist installation by Mary Bernadette Lee

In response to Everything you know goes away, visual artist Mrydette offers up an antidote to all nostalgic ailments with a rose-tinted, tongue-in-cheek nostalgic clinic.

The clinic is designed as a contemplative space, featuring artworks constructed with chou chou (security blankets) contributed by the public through an open call.

CHILDREN’S WORKSHOPS


As part of Everything you know goes away, join us for an assortment of delectable school holiday offerings in the form of workshops and performances, suitable for children aged 2 to 12.


Kueh Salah: A Kueh Creation Session with Mrydette


What if things appeared and reappeared purely from the tips of our fingers? And remembering and forgetting became a buffet for the imagination? Feast your eyes and fingers on a creative kueh-making session by visual artist Mrydette, conducted in a delectable universe of her creation.

Learn to make your own homemade colourful playdough and specialty “kueh” from scratch with basic ingredients from the kitchen. Bring a tupperware to store and air dry your creations at home!

Goodbye Animals: Workshop and Storytelling with Darel Seow


We might not have lions (except in tales), but Singapore used to be home to many wild tigers and leopards! At this workshop, storyteller Darel Seow introduces children to some local endangered and extinct animals that we share this island with. You’ll learn how to draw them and create a simple pop-up diorama which will explore our impact on the environment and the relationship we have with our non-human neighbours.

Annie Ting and the Dragon by Tiny Feat


Annie Ting is little girl who looks different from the people around her. She goes on a big adventure and discovers that kindness, empathy, and love can be found in the most unexpected of places.

This interactive puppet theatre performance features a live musician and two puppeteers.

KUEH SALAH
17 & 31 MAR, 10.30– 11.30AM
The Substation Theatre

$15/child

For ages 6 to 12

GOODBYE ANIMALS
22 & 30 MAR, 10.30AM–12PM
The Substation Theatre

$18/child

For ages 7 to 12

ANNIE TING AND THE DRAGON
23 & 24 MAR, 10.30–11.10AM
The Substation Theatre

$18/child

For ages 2 to 5

BOOK A SLOT FOR YOUR KIDDOS NOW︎

* EARLY BIRD SALES FROM 11–31 JAN
(10% DISCOUNT)





23 MAR, 5–6.30PM
The Substation Gallery

Free Admission




PANEL DISCUSSION

Partners in Grime: Nostalgia and Conservation


From films and photos that lovingly document old places to sepia-tinged stories of childhood kampongs, arguments for heritage conservation often rely on nostalgia. But while nostalgia-fuelled conservation has frequently worked, what—if any—are the costs, effects, impact, implications, and risks of this approach? Does nostalgia cheapen heritage? Does it erode historicity or historical consciousness? Or are these worries needless as long as nostalgia is strategically deployed—though, what does such a deployment look like?

A panel of artists, activists, and academics presents examples of nostalgia and its uses, and reflects on the potential effects of this phenomenon.

Speakers:
Dr. Chua Ai Lin (Executive Director, Singapore Heritage Society)
Joshua Comaroff (Design Consultant, Lekker Architects)
Tan Pin Pin (Filmmaker)

Moderated by Lo Mun Hou (Associate Professor, University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore)

FILM SCREENING & READINGS

Days of Future Past


This film- and literature-filled evening takes place in a Singapore of the future.

Against the backdrop of Tan Pin Pin’s In Time to Come (2017), a meta-documentary about time capsules, speculative fictions and visions of the future are performed by writers. The readings present the fantastic, connected with the cultures, traditions, mythologies, folk religions, and daily life in Southeast Asia. Prior to the screening, the programme begins with a short introduction ('Nostalgia Before Its Time') by Lo Mun Hou.  

The programme is curated by Jason Erik Lundberg, Founding Editor of LONTAR: The Journal of Southeast Asian Speculative Fiction.

30 MAR, 4–5.30PM
SAD Bar

Free Admission

REGISTER HERE︎

* Note: In Time to Come will NOT be screened in its original, uninterrupted form.



 
29 & 30 MAR, 7–10PM (2 sessions/day)
Session 1: 7–8PM
Session 2: 9-10PM

The Substation Gallery

$35/pax

BOOK YOUR PLATE HERE︎

* Note: No pork or lard will be served in the dishes. However, we do not have a halal certification.
#SUBAFTERDARK

SAD: The Last Meal


A collaboration between Ming Tan and Debbie Ding

In the near future, the food that is available for our consumption has changed, but a longing for the taste of "home" always remains. What is this instinct towards nostalgia, or a desire to return to the past, which transforms itself into an anxiety of progress?

SAD: The Last Meal addresses Singapore's obsession with nostalgia, by looking at the alleged death of the Singaporean hawker, the corresponding fetishisation and commercialisation of local food iconography, and somewhere in between, the anxiety around losing a facet of heritage that this country holds so dear—our local food culture. If home were to cease, what would you like as your last meal?

Join us for an interactive art experience with a four-course food tasting menu designed specially by chef Ming Tan, in collaboration with visual artist and technologist Debbie Ding.

BTW, WHY SO SAD AGAIN?︎