COMPETITION

UTTERLY CHANGED

START

21 JUN


END

03 SEP


#utterlychanged


Utterly changed: The Substation Writing Competition


2018 sees The Substation exploring heritage in its multifarious forms—from instrumentalised versions of the Singapore Story vis à-vis SG50 and nostalgia-steeped festivals, to different modes of resistance, contestation, and collaboration.

How to join:

Write a creative work in English, from 200 to 2,000 words long, in response to local heritage and what it means to you. There is no restriction to genre or form (narrative prose, creative non-fiction, and experimental work are welcome).

To join, post a piece publicly on your Facebook timeline, tag the event page, ‘Utterly changed. The Substation Writing Competition’, and use the competition #utterlychanged. Entries are limited to 1 per Facebook account.

The competition closes 3 September 2018, 12pm.


PRIZES

First Prize

$3,000

Second Prize

$2,000

Third Prize

$1,000


People’s Choice

Based on most no. of likes


$500


Jurors’ Choice
Book Prizes (x7)



Each juror’s book of choice with personalised note




JURY CHAIR

Boey Kim Cheng



JURORS

Ng Yi-Sheng
Clara Chow
Darryl Whetter
Jennifer Anne Champion
Lai Chee Kien
Marc Nair



Boey Kim Cheng


Associate Professor,
School of Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences,
Nanyang Technological University

Boey Kim Cheng emigrated from Singapore in 1997 to Australia. As an Asian Australian writer, Boey has published a travel memoir Between Stations, which was shortlisted for the W.A. Premier’s Literary Award for Nonfiction, and a fifth collection of poems Clear Brightness, was shortlisted for the John Bray Poetry Prize and the NSW Premier’s Multicultural Award. Boey co-founded Mascara Literary Review, the first Australian literary journal to promote Asian Australian writing, and co-edited the groundbreaking anthology Contemporary Asian Australian Poets (2013). In 2016, Boey returned to Singapore to join Nanyang Technological University as an Associate Professor at the Division of English.


Clara Chow



Author, Journalist

Clara Chow is the author of story collections Dream Storeys (Ethos, 2016) and Modern Myths (Math Paper Press, 2018). Having started her career as a journalist, she has been writer-in-residence at South Korea’s Toji Cultural Centre and at the ASEAN Literary Festival in Jakarta. In 2015, she co-founded online arts and literary platform WeAreAWebsite.com.


Jennifer Anne Champion



Writer, Performance Poet

Jennifer Anne Champion is a writer and performance poet from Singapore. She serves as co-founder and multimedia editor at poetry.sg with the young artist collective Image-Symbol Department. She also teaches slam poetry and creative writing in schools in collaboration with organisations such as Word Forward, the National Arts Council, and the Ministry of Education. Jennifer co-edited the anthology SingPoWriMo and released her first chapbook, A History of Clocks, in 2015. Her latest poetry collection is Caterwaul (2016). She is currently working on her first novel Majulah.



Marc Nair



Poet, Photographer

Marc Nair is a poet and photographer. He is a recipient of the 2016 Young Artist Award. He has performed spoken word in solo and group performances for fifteen years in more than ten countries and has represented Singapore in international poetry slam competitions. Marc has published five solo volumes of poetry and has released another three collections in collaboration with visual artists, photographers, and graphic artists. His latest collection of poetry, Vital Possessions, will be released in August 2018. Marc was the 2016-17 NTU-NAC National Writer in Residence and is the co-founder of Mackerel, a culture magazine.

Ng Yi-Sheng


Writer

Ng Yi-Sheng is a Singaporean poet, playwright, fictionist, critic, journalist, and LGBT+ activist. His books include the poetry collections last boy (winner of the Singapore Literature Prize 2008), Loud Poems for a Very Obliging Audience and A Book of Hims, as well as the film novelisation Eating Air and the best-selling non-fiction work SQ21: Singapore Queers in the 21st Century. Additionally, he translated Wong Yoon Wah’s Chinese poetry collection The New Village and has co-edited national and regional anthologies such as GASPP: a Gay Anthology of Singaporean Poetry and Prose, Eastern Heathens: Asian Folklore Subverted, and Heat. He was the winner of the first Singapore Poetry Slam in 2003, and served as a founding member of the spoken word collective the Party Action People. He is currently a PhD student at NTU, and will soon be publishing his short story collection Lion City. He tweets and Instagrams at @yishkabob.


Darryl Whetter



Programme Leader of MA Creative Writing,
School of Creative Industries, LASALLE College of the Arts


Darryl Whetter

Dr Whetter is a novelist, poet, essayist, scholar, short-story writer, and critic from Canada. His first book, the story collection A Sharp Tooth in the Fur, was named a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book of 2003. His novels include the multi-generational smuggling epic Keeping Things Whole and the bicycle odyssey The Push & the Pull. His first book of poems, Origins, concerns evolution, energy, and extinction. A second poetry collection is forthcoming in 2017. He has published or presented literary essays in France, Germany, Sweden, USA, Canada, England, India, and Iceland. His book reviews appear in numerous papers, including The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, The National Post, The Montreal Gazette and The Detroit Times, as well as on national CBC Radio.



Lai Chee Kien



Architect

Lai Chee Kien is Adjunct Associate Professor at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (Architecture and Sustainable Design pillar), and also a registered architect in Singapore. He graduated from the National University of Singapore with an M Arch. by research [1996], and a PhD in History of Architecture & Urban Design from the University of California, Berkeley [2005]. His publications include A Brief History of Malayan Art (1999), Building Merdeka: Independence Architecture in Kuala Lumpur, 1957-1966 (2007), Cords to Histories (2013), Through the Lens of Lee Kip Lin (2015) [Best Non-Fiction Title, 2016], and Building Memories: People, Architecture, Independence (2016) [Book of the Year]. He researches on histories of art, architecture, settlements, urbanism, and landscapes in Southeast Asia.